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higher is less impact?

Stella handled tricky maneuvers better at 22 and is lazy at 20. Much wider turns and less tight with me... In a private lesson a couple weeks ago (in which we were to tackle how to get her to blast off the startline because typically now it's half way through a run that she ignites) we accidentally left half the bars at Glances height of 26 and it she was handling the sequence beautifully like piece of cake.

So in view of the copy snd paste below from the clean run discussion thread on jump heights---I wonder if in my thinking of preserving her physically for a longer agility career and sounder life and only running her in preferred which she now jumps at 20... Did I make a mistake?


This is actually a topic that is often debated and will likely to continue to be until we have better scientific data. I strongly believe in evaluating your dog and how he runs and jumps, and also his build and structure, before making a decision. But something to consider is that many dogs run more horizontally and jump flat out at lower heights, resulting in more forward propulsion and speed – more momentum forward means more impact on the body when landing. Many of these dogs if they have to collect and jump more vertically than horizontally, can actually put less impact on their body.
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> I think what puts the most stress on dogs physically is having to compensate for us giving poor signals so that they make the wrong decision about which way a course goes and they have to change direction while attempting to land.
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> Look at your dog and watch how he uses his body over the jumps – assuming he is confident about what his job is… video tape is a really good idea when making these decisions.
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> Monica Percival

Comments

( 5 comments — Leave a comment )
nosemovie
Nov. 4th, 2014 01:26 pm (UTC)
I think Monica is spot on in all she typed there. Razor was at 26 for the first 4 years of his career as he skimmed the lower hights. He's down now, and looks fine at 20. But, it's opposite w Rumble. Each dog has to be looked at for strengths/weaknesses etc.
aardogs
Nov. 4th, 2014 01:43 pm (UTC)
Panic measured into 20 but I jumped him 24/26 for years because of what you described. 20 is a speed bump for him. He would launch himself and generally not be thoughtful so overall the higher heights worked much better for him. Now I think he looks great at 20.
teaguestoy
Nov. 4th, 2014 03:09 pm (UTC)
Teague is a huge "skimmer with 1/4 inch to spare" at 20" and looks great at 22" - but going higher with him, didn't seem to improve anything. I do like what Monica wrote and think it is true - particularly the part about our late cues - they take some dangerous face and shoulder plants trying to accomodate our late cues. I am guilty of this. :(. I think the other thing is dogs, ahem Teague, who don't really modify their speed no matter WHAT they are doing - it's always balls to the wall/tits to the wind - GO - turns be damned! That's worrisome to me, and concerns me a lot with Teague.

With Flyte - I've taught her to turn tighter, so she actually will gear down to take a jump on which she's turning, which is awesome and I hope will help save her little body.

Edited at 2014-11-04 03:11 pm (UTC)
talesofmyboys
Nov. 4th, 2014 08:33 pm (UTC)
"But something to consider is that many dogs run more horizontally and jump flat out at lower heights, resulting in more forward propulsion and speed – more momentum forward means more impact on the body when landing. Many of these dogs if they have to collect and jump more vertically than horizontally, can actually put less impact on their body."

IMHO that part is total BS. The flatter angle of landing from a lower height is much better for a dog than the acute angle of landing from a higher height. I do think the part about late turn cues is spot on.

Here is one paper on the subject, hopefully the link will work, it is a pdf: http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CB4QFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.researchgate.net%2Fprofile%2FKirsty_Lesniak%2Fpublication%2F259360006_Effect_of_fence_height_on_joint_angles_of_agility_dogs%2Flinks%2F00b7d5371f2120f1f1000000%3Forigin%3Dpublication_detail&ei=uzVZVJbkH4KcigLUooHYDQ&usg=AFQjCNECHtw6Rr0T1hCefh0Cfvo5_MxM9w&sig2=o3W0b7MZAjI0CllGO7mKNQ
dinahprincedaly
Nov. 5th, 2014 01:28 am (UTC)
It's hard for me to understand the charts but it's an interesting study. So from this it looks like take off can do a significant amount of damage, not just landing--depending on the angles.
I do know some dogs are better built/designed for agility. And when we visited suzzanne clothier with my sister for her consultation on Matilda, she pointed out that for the jumping our labradoodles required a significant amount of hind end and core work to make up for a structure weakness... Remembering this now I guess I didn't make a wrong decision. But it was such a surprise to me that the accidental 26 inch jumps were so easy for Stella. Perhaps not on a regular basis though...
( 5 comments — Leave a comment )